TRABAJOS PRESENTADOS POR EL DR. ALBERTO CORMILLOT Y COLABORADORES EN CONGRESOS INTERNACIONALES

 

A SIMPLE FORMULA TO DETERMINE ABDOMINAL FAT RELATED METABOLIC RISK FACTORS

 

Cormillot A., Debeza A., Panzica M.P., Karagenzian O. Clínica Cormillot, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

8th International Congress on Obesity, Paris, France. 29August-3Sept. 1998.

There is a tight relationship between metabolic risk factors (RF) and abdominal fat distribution. Waist perimeter ()WP) and Sagital Diameter (SD) are usually taken as a measure of abdominal fat. In order to discriminate between subcutaneous and visceral fat, the latter being more related to RF, expensive techniques such as tomographies and ecographies are usually employed. The aim of our studies was to find a simple formula to determine visceral fat and its capacity to predict RF in the medical office. Several formulas were tried out and cross-validated with other anthropometric parameters. The one presented here is (Sagital Diameter) / (Transversal Diameter) x WP = IGIA. The rational for the formula used here is given by the fact that, when a person lays down, visceral fat stays in place, while subcutaneous fat distributes at sides, enlarging the transverse diameter. One hundred and nine subjects, mean age 39, BMI between 21 and 49 were tested for Total Cholesterol, HDL-Col, LDL-Col, Tg, Uric Acid, Fibrinogen, Insulin, Glucose and Hypertension. These 9RF were rated according to the clinical and epidemiological experience and each ptient was given a “score” from 1 to 16. This “score” was tested for its relationship to the index formula SD and Transverse Diameter measures were performed by means of an enlarge caliper specially designed by Maria Pia Panzica and Oscar Karagenzian.

Spearman Rank correlation performed between the parameters IGIA and the score was r = 0.76 (p <<0.0001) (for DS and WF alone were r = 0.71 and r = 0.70 respectively in the same sample). These results did not improve when heigth, BMI or other measures were considered. Besides low IGIA was related to absence of familiar antecedents of early cardiovascular disease. This is a simple formula to be utilized in the medical practice. In order to be widely useful, it must be tested in a random free-living population and in a prospective study.